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only i will remain

mel. she/her. you'll mostly find fiction analysis, gaming, books, art & writing tips, morbid humor, and pretentious artsy stuff here.

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what i hope to be remembered for

Sighișoara (Romania) is considered to be the most beautiful and well preserved inhabited citadel in Europe with authentic medieval architecture.

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notmargaery:

*university voice* unfortunately… we have too much money… so we have to raise tuition so we can build a place to keep all the other money in… so sorry unavoidable

brakken:

conquer yourself

brakken:

conquer yourself

wannabeanimator:

A Letter To Momo Official US Release Trailer 1 (2014)

theonion:

Man Not Himself Until He Has So Much Coffee He Feels Like He’s Going To Die
I am thy creature; I ought to be Adam; But I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed. Everywhere I see bliss, from which I alone am irrevocably excluded.
Monster - Frankenstein (The Modern Prometheus) by Mary Shelley 1818 (via drakoumel)

archiemcphee:

In 1888 actress Ellen Terry performed the role of Lady Macbeth at London’s Lyceum Theatre while wearing an awesome green gown bedecked with the 1,000 sloughed-off wings of the jewel beetle. It quickly became one of the most celebrated costumes of the Victorian era, immortalized in a portrait painted by John Singer Sargent.

126 years is a long time and over the years Dame Terry’s dress experienced all sorts of wear and tear and numerous alterations. But after 1,300 hours of painstaking work over and £50,000 ($81,000) in expenses, this magnificent costume has been restored to its original glory.

Work began on the gown two years ago after a successful fundraising campaign, but restoring the beetle wings wasn’t the most difficult task. “We had collected the beetle wings that had fallen off over the years,” says Paul Meredith, house manager at Smallhythe Place, where the dress now resides, “so that the conservator was able to reattach many of the originals, plus others that had been donated to us—1,000 in total.” The restoration team patched the 100 or so broken wings using small pieces of Japanese tissue and wheat starch paste.

Click here to read more about the restoration process.

Photos by Zenzie Tinker

[via Morbid Anatomy and Ecouterre]


Evening by the lake, Detail. by Max Nonnenbruch

Evening by the lake, Detail. by Max Nonnenbruch

ancientart:

Askos with painted scenes and applied figures. 

Dating to about 270-200 BCE, this askos was found at Cuma in Campania, Italy, and was made at Canosa, Apulia (modern Puglia).

Vessels of this type were evidently not intended to be functional, and were often made to be placed inside tombs. The British Museum houses another Canosan vessel shaped like a head, which you may view hereCanosa was a highly important city of ancient Apulia, which, although influenced by the Greeks, was able to maintain its local culture through to Roman times.

This vase is basically an askos, a simple globular spouted vessel of a shape found in Italy for over two millennia. By the Hellenistic period askoi were over-burdened with a wealth of decoration. This example has two winged horses flying over a brown sea on a pink background. Three winged figures of Nike or Victory stand on the false spouts and handle, and foreparts of horses spring from the body of the vessel. The applied reliefs depict a winged head of the gorgon Medusa and a dancing maenad, a follower of Dionysos. (BM)

Courtesy of & currently located at the British Museum, London, GR 1862.7-12.2. Photos taken by SpirosK photography.